Dedication of Zacharias

The account of Zacharias is inspiring. He and his wife, Elizabeth, prayed to have a son but their prayers were not answered and now they were old in years. We read in the New Testament:

And it came to pass, that while he executed the priest’s office before God in the order of his course,

According to the custom of the priest’s office, his lot was to burn incense when he went into the temple of the Lord. (Luke 1:8-9)

If we look into the scriptures (see 1 Chronicles 24:10, Nehemiah 12:4), we learn that Zacharias was of the tribe of Levi. In the Bible Dictionary we read:

The work of ministering in the sanctuary was assigned to this tribe. The Levites are sometimes spoken of as distinct from the priests (1 Kgs. 8:4Ezra 2:70John 1:19); sometimes as though all Levites were also priests, “the priests, the Levites”…

So from this we learn that Zacharias was tasked with working for the Lord in the temple and he must have shown some dedication in his life to this duty. If we are unsure of this we can read in Luke 1:6:

And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and
ordinances of the Lord blameless.

Blameless – walking in all commandments. I think already we can take it that Zacharias was diligent in his priesthood duties. This is where we find Zacharias where he is visited by the Angel Gabriel and told of the miracle that was to take place. We know that he is told that his aged wife was to have a child called John. He finds this hard to believe and he is struck dumb for his unbelief.

We might be forgiven for thinking ill of Zacharias for this unbelief. Although, I’m not sure how I would feel if this were to happen to me. However, what stood out most to me was Zacharias’s reaction after this event. He has been visited by an angel, told his wife will now be pregnant with a miracle child, struck dumb as a sign of his unbelief and what does Zacharias do?

23 And it came to pass, that, as soon as the days of his ministration were accomplished,
he departed to his own house. (Luke 1:23)

If I were in Zacharias’s position I would return home. I would want to tell my family, find comfort from the fact that I could not speak and share what marvelous experience just happened to me. However, Zacharias stayed and completed his duty before he then departed to his own house. An example of dedication to the Lord, the Temple and his duty.

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Trim Your Lamp

This is just the first in my planned weekly entry on one thing I have learnt in the Come Follow Me programme (although I didn’t post this last week due to things I needed to do with my calling).

In the first week we had a look at the Parable of the Ten Virgins.

Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten virginswhich took their lampsand went forth to meet the bridegroom.

And five of them were wise, and five were foolish. (Matthew 25:1-2)

As a side note – I wondered if there was significance in the numbers, five wise and five foolish? We know that the kingdom of heaven on Earth is referring to the Lord’s Church. Does this indicate the proportion of the Lord’s kingdom who will be prepared for the Second Coming of the Lord? Maybe, maybe not – but it did cause me to consider about my standing if I would be ready.

Anyway – the main thing that caught my eye was found in this verses:

And at midnight there was cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to
meet him.

Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps(Matthew 25:6-7)

I’ve skimmed over these verses in the past and just presumed it referred to ensuring we are ready for the Saviour. However, the phrase ‘trimmed their lamps’ did make me wonder what this actually meant and what could we learn from the analogy.

So, a Google Search was in order. From the search I gathered this information:
This care involved trimming the wick, which drew the oil up from the storage reservoir, so that the flame would be clean and bright. Lamp trimmers also refilled the reservoirs, which held enough oil for several hours of burning, but not enough to start a major fire if the lamp were to be knocked down or damaged somehow.
A poorly trimmed wick creates a flame which is dim and smoky. A properly trimmed wick should come to a rounded point, or should be wedge shaped. When lit, the wick should burn cleanly all the way up to the highest flame it can make. (Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamp_trimmer)

This explanation was illuminating! We know that there are reasons for why the Master Teacher would use certain analogies and whilst the Parable of the Ten Virgins is a lesson in preparing for the Second Coming, there is reference here to light and tending to that light in our own souls..

We tend to our own ‘lights’ by:

  1. Trimming our lamps – in order to have the clearest light in our testimonies, we would need to work at ‘trimming’ our lamps. One way we do this may be ensuring we live worthy to have the presence of the Spirit in our hearts. We must ensure we are ready to receive the good things which light the candle of testimony in our hearts.
  2. Pouring oil into the lamp – when we are ready to receive the fuel, we then study, pray, partake of the sacrament to fuel the flame of testimony in our hearts.

As I studied this analogy, I couldn’t help marveling at the layers that were there within it. We can then link this in with Christ being the Light of the World – but that can be one for a future post. I can’t wait to continue studying the New Testament this year in the Come Follow Me programme.

Walking with the Saviour

In a sacrament meeting talk recently I was drawn again to the story of the Saviour walking on the water toward His disciples. In this experience, a number of lessons were highlighted and things that can be likened to our experience when out in this voyage called mortality.

The disciples had been sent on by the Saviour whilst He went alone to pray. I imagine that the Saviour in order to fulfill His ministry required close communion with His Father in Heaven. Meanwhile, the disciples were running into a little trouble:
“But the ship was now in the midst of the sea, tossed with waves: for the wind was
contrary.” (Matthew 14:24)

Straightaway we see a parallel with our lives today. Often, we will feel in the midst of the sea in our day-to-day lives. Sometimes we drift peacefully along with the swells and current, moving towards our destination. At others, we will wash up at the end of the day and wonder what on earth happened in the past 15 hours or more! Sometimes the wind is pleasant, at others it can certainly be contrary!

“And in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went unto them, walking on the sea.
And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, It is a
spirit; and they cried out for fear.” (Matthew 14:25-26)

In the past I have been surprised that the disciples’ reaction was one of fear. However, it makes sense when you understand that ‘the fourth watch of the night’ is between 3am-6am. It is the dead of night, they are battling against contrary winds and suddenly they see a figure approaching them on the water they are fighting so hard to steer through. Their fear is understandable, but the Saviour soon puts them at ease.

“But straightway Jesus spake unto them, saying, Be of good cheerit is I; be not afraid.
And Peter answered him and said, Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the
water.” (Matthew 14:27-28)

Peter’s reaction is very interesting. For many people, they may be in that scenario and invite the Saviour to enter the boat with them. They may call out to their friend and ask Him to join them. However, Peter calls out to the Saviour and asks if he can join Him on the tempestuous waters. I find this fascinating. There could be two possible reasons. The first is that he wanted to perform the same miracle that the Saviour was manifesting. I doubt this but it is a possibility. The other reason (and the more likely one in my opinion) is that he wanted to be where the Saviour was and walk with Him. Imagine wanting to leave the safety of the boat and wanting to step out into the murky unknown. However again we can see the similarities in our life. We often will need to take leaps of faith towards the Saviour but He always is there to invite us. 

And he said, Come. And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the
water, to go to Jesus.
But when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraidand beginning to sink, he cried,
saying, Lord, save me.
And immediately Jesus stretched forth his hand, and caught him, and said unto him, O
thou of little faithwherefore didst thou doubt(Matthew 14:29-31)

Our Saviour is always there. As soon as we begin to doubt or we fall short, His hand will always be there as a constant support to us if we will reach back and accept His help. The parallels are clear in this instance.

This experience has so many lessons contained in it that we can learn a lot. As we move into 2019 and focus on the stories of the Saviour’s life, I look forward to looking more deeply into these stories and accounts to learn more.

From Small Things…

I was visiting my wife’s work recently where I was learning remarkable facts about the world around us. I’m not a huge fan of animal attractions but my kids love it and my wife loves learning about animals and it’s a good day out so I was going along. However there was something that caught my eye that I thought was incredible.

At her work, they have Japanese Spider Crabs – which in themselves are pretty incredible. 

IMG_20181222_153740615

The size that these animals grow to is pretty impressive but it wasn’t this that impressed me the most! It was this fact:

IMG_20181222_153749164

I found this fascinating! This huge creature started life as a creature that wouldn’t be able to be seen as a baby!

It made me think of other things that begin very small but then become great things – particularly in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

For a start, we are taught that it is through small and simple things that great things happen in the work of the Lord. We read in Alma 37:6-7

“Now ye may suppose that this is foolishness in me; but behold I say unto you, that by small and simple things are great things brought to pass; and small means in many instances doth confound the wise.

And the Lord God doth work by means to bring about his great and eternal purposes; and by very small means the Lord doth confound the wise and bringeth about the salvation of many souls.”

Perhaps another example that applies even more if the teaching on faith by the Saviour. He taught that faith as small as the mustard seed can become strong. 

“And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief: for verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you.” (Matthew 17:20)

When you think of the actual growth that the Japanese Spider Crab makes in relation to the size it begins, that in itself is a miracle. This can be an example of how the small, minute amount of faith that we have can have an incredible impact.

One final example of the miracle of the Spider Crab can be related is how the mustard seed itself grows impossibly tall compared to the size of it’s seed. Christ again teaches this in a parable, which he explains that he does so that those who are listening to learn may learn and understand more clearly. He taught about the mustard seed:

“…The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field:

Which indeed is the least of all seeds: but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof.” (Matthew 13:31-32)

If this parable is to be understood, we could also liken the kingdom of God to an infant Japanese Spider Crab. It begins very small, microscopic by some measurements. Then, it grows and grows beyond all possible comprehension due to the size it began. It’s amazing when you consider the world around us and how all of God’s creations are intertwined, link and testify of one another.

The Soul’s Sincere Desire

In D&C 10:5 it reads:

Pray‍ always, that you may come off conqueror; yea, that you may conquer Satan, and that you may escape‍ the hands of the servants of Satan that do uphold his work.

Sister Carol F. McConkie of the Young Women General Presidency gave a talk which was entitiled ‘The Soul’s Sincere Desire’. We know that in order to truly hone our desires, in order to come closer to the Lord and ultimately overcome Satan and his temptations we must call upon the powers of heaven to support us – we must pray.

Prayer is, I feel, one of the simplest principles we have in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, however it is one that is understood or utilised the least. I feel this at least in my own life. Whilst I do pray on a daily basis, my prayers do not contain or produce the power that they should.

Sister McConkie made the blessings of powerful prayer clear when she said:

“For us, miraculous healing, powerful protection, divine knowledge, liberating forgiveness, and precious peace are among the answers that come when we offer up a “soul’s sincere desire” in faith.” Can you say that your prayers offer the blessings listed here as much as they should or could? I know we all will be at different stages in the power of our personal prayers but we must all progress.

What is Prayer?

The key to starting this progress is to ask the very basic question – what is prayer? This is something that already we can easily misunderstand. Whilst it is indeed an opportunity to commune with and interact with our Heavenly Father, prayer is so much more.

Prayer is a miraculous gift. We have been sent to Earth to live by faith and yet we have been provided with something so precious as it allows us to contact the Being who allowed us to come here. However, there are some very important things to remember with prayer. Prayers are not an opportunity to place an order and accept things instantly. To begin with, a look in the Bible Dictionary will tell us “Many of the so-called difficulties about prayer arise from forgetting this relationship. Prayer is the act by which the will of the Father and the will of the child are brought into correspondence with each other. The object of prayer is not to change the will of God but to secure for ourselves and for others blessings that God is already willing to grant but that are made conditional on our asking for them. Blessings require some work or effort on our part before we can obtain them. Prayer is a form of work and is an appointed means for obtaining the highest of all blessings.” Prayer is the means by which we can come closer to God and, as such, bring our will closer to His. We can ask for blessings and if we receive that blessing, it is because the Lord is willing to give it to us and would have if we asked.

This is why it is vital we remember prayer as being a two-way communication. If you wanted to have a conversation with me, you would not approach me, list a number of thoughts and questions you had and then leave without me responding. Then why are we so easy or willing to have this kind of conversation with Heavenly Father?

I don’t think we do this on purpose – perhaps we are unused to talking with the Lord in a way that we speak to him and converse with Him?

Thinking about this – I was visiting a ward recently to speak in on Sunday and a sister missionary spoke before me. She spoke of prayer and an experience she had over Christmas. All the missionaries were invited on Christmas Day to engage in a 45 minute prayer. As this daunting task lay before her, she planned what she would discuss with her Heavenly Father and was able to pause for answers. This illuminated me. In all my years of, quite frankly, failing to consistently hold meaningful prayers I had never thought of this! Actually sitting down and planning what I would discuss in my prayers. I am a very methodical person so I decided to give this a go. As I planned the prayer then called to Heavenly Father, three amazing things happened:

  1. Before I even started the prayer, I found that through the day I was picking things up or noticing things I wanted to talk to my Heavenly Father about – things that I would have forgotten about at the ridiculous hour at which I go to sleep when saying my closing prayer for the day
  2. My prayer was a lot more focused. As I had prepared prayerfully the things I would discuss, I found that I was able to form more coherent thoughts which led to a more effective discussion
  3. I wanted answers. Because I had clear things to discuss, I was more eager to listen to the Spirit for answers Heavenly Father had for me so I waited for them. Then, when I received answers, I wanted to explore those answers more in detail because I had a clearer purpose to my prayer rather than just saying my prayers because I should say my prayers!

Our Desire’s Answer

As you pray with more power, you will find your soul’s sincere desires addressed more by Heavenly Father. Sister McConkie talked about a parable that Christ gave – she said:

He told of a judge who did not honor God and did not have any regard for mankind. Repeatedly, a widow came before him, pleading to be avenged of her adversary. For a while, the judge would offer her no relief. But as a result of her faithful, consistent pleading, the judge finally thought, “Because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.”

Then Jesus explained:

“Shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him … ?

In other words, if we ask a mortal person repeatedly about something they will probably answer eventually because we are pestering them. So then, our Heavenly Father, who loves us dearly, will surely hear out prayers and answer them because He loves us with a perfect love. He knows the sincere desires of our soul and when we call upon His name, He will be able to help us.

The Best Gifts

However, this promise does come with a clear condition. If we pray with a sincere desire Heavenly Father will hear and answer our prayers. It does not mean that we govern His answer. Our Heavenly Father will always bless us with what we NEED, not necessarily what we WANT – and very often those two things are different.

Sometimes, this outcome of prayer is difficult to understand. We must remember the words of Isaiah in of my favourite verses which reads:

“For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

Even if we know and understand this principle, it is not easy. The most asked question I had on my mission was not about plural marriage or tithing, but it was an honest question which more people have than you might think. The question was this – “If God was really there, why does he let bad things happen to this person who is a really good person?”

A while ago we were teaching prayer in our Family Home Evening and we were considering how we could get across to our 4 year old son that we should pray to Heavenly Father for help but sometimes He will know how best to help us even if we want something a lot. We came across this analogy which I really liked:

It was Saturday morning, and father was home. He had brought some work from the office to complete and went into the study to be alone.

(1) Soon his little daughter came into the room crying. Someone had broken her new doll. Her father told her not to worry: he would fix her doll. She thanked her father and ran happily back to play.

(2) Next his son came in. He asked his father for money to buy a new model boat to take sailing with his friends. His father took time to explain that the boy had already received his weekly allowance two days ago with the understanding that it was to take care of such things.

(3) His teenage daughter came in next. She wanted a new dress for the coming dance. Her father told her that she would have to wait. He told her that if she saved as much as she could herself, he would help her buy the new dress.

(4) His teenage son interrupted the father next. The son was doing his homework and needed help with a problem. His father gave him some suggestions, but did not work the problem for him. A few minutes later, his son returned to say, “Thank you for the idea you gave me. It worked!”

(5) Finally, the youngest child came in. His father looked down at the boy and asked kindly, “What do you want, son?” “I don’t want anything,” the little boy answered as he reached his arms around his father’s neck and kissed him. “I just wanted to be with you.”

I loved this. I wish I knew this story when I was on my mission. This story breaks down various glorious understanding as to why we have different answers to prayers as a witness to how a loving father works – and it is the same with our loving Heavenly Father.

For (1) the child was ready to receive and the father listened, intervened and supported the children. In this instance, the child does need that help but cannot help themselves and so the father listens and acts.

For (2) the child had to understand responsibility. They were listened to but did not get the response they wanted. If they were to receive it they would quickly become spoiled and presume to receive things whenever they wish. They had to learn to do without the thing they didn’t really need.

For (3) the child again was listened to by this loving parent. This was a blessing that was required, but this child had means wherewith they could contribute. It would be foolish of the parent to give the money or the blessing in full instantly – what would the child learn? They had to put the work in beforehand and the father would make up the rest.

For (4) the child had to work out the answer themselves. If they were given the answer they would not grow or develop. The loving parent listened and gave suggestions but then let the child go away and work it out. As a result, the child was so grateful to the parent and had developed.

For (5) the child clearly loved their father. They only wanted to interact to say how much they loved their parent and were grateful for all he had done for them. I’m sure Heavenly Father would love to receive more prayers like this!

Sister McConkie added this in her remarks: The answers we receive in prayer may not be what we would desire. But in times of trouble, our prayers become a lifeline of love and tender mercy.”

“He does not want us to suffer longer or endure more trials than needed. He does want us to turn to Him and allow Him to ease our burdens, to heal our hearts, and to cleanse our souls through His purifying power.”

Questions about the Church

I was listening to another Mormon Messages extract recently, this time an interview with a man who works for the Church History Department. I found this fascinating and gave me some food for thought. It was focused on what to do when shown events in Church History that haven’t been experienced before.

Firstly, I want to make something clear. There is a reason I have given this post the specific title it’s been given. When we come up against questions of faith in the Church it is very often for this reason: the Church. It is rarely (although it does happen) questions about the Gospel. The Church and the Gospel are two completely different entities. One is the eternal plan devised by a loving Heavenly Father, whose goal and focus is to bring to pass the immortality and eternal life of man. The other is the earthly institution, instigated by Jesus Christ Himself, which officiates in and makes available the ordinances and support structure for Heavenly Father’s children to live the Gospel easier. You cannot have the Church without the Gospel, but our faith is sometimes built upon the ‘Church’ rather than the ‘Gospel’. Whilst it is important to have a living testimony of the Church (which involves the passing on of priesthood keys and living prophets and apostles), it is more important to have a testimony of the Gospel (which involves our Saviour Jesus Christ and the plan that has been prepared for us). In this post when I refer to struggles of faith, I am referring to the unfortunate cases where a member doubts the truth of the Gospel because of questions they have about the Church and in particular, events where they are unsure why certain things happened in Church History.

The Doubt

I think it would be naive to think that no adult member of this Church has ever come across some of the challenges to faith that could occur when it comes to Church History. Questions about polygamy, Joseph Smith, the Priesthood and other such topics are often discussed in modern popular culture, never mind some individuals who actively go about and seek to undermine the Church and its teachings. However, every now and again there will be stories or rumours about certain events that will shake us. We have a doubt, and that leads us to question.

However, this is a very important stage and it’s important for the individual to recognise that this is completely normal. The brother in the Mormon Messages segment was very clear on this. There seems to be a cultural anomaly that has developed within the Church – that to question things is wrong. If we have a question we had better forget about the question and just keep doing what we’re meant to. However, as he wisely pointed out, that culture isn’t doctrinal. In fact, to say we shouldn’t question goes against doctrine. We read throughout every part of the Standard Works that we should ask the Lord about anything we so feel:

Askand it shall be given you; seekand ye shall find; knockand it shall be opened unto you:

For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened. (Matthew 7:7-8)

And when ye shall receive these things, would exhort you that ye would ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if these things are not trueand if ye shall ask with sincere heartwith real intenthaving faith in Christ, he will manifest the truth of it unto you, by the power of the Holy Ghost.

And by the power of the Holy Ghost ye may know the truth of all things. (Moroni 10:4-5)

Oliver Cowderyverily, verily, say unto you, that assuredly as the Lord liveth, who is your God and your Redeemer, even so surely shall you receive knowledge of whatsoever things you shall ask in faith, with an honest heart, believing that you shall receive knowledge concerning the engravings of old recordswhich are ancient, which contain those parts of my scripture of which has been spoken by the manifestation of my Spirit.

Yea, behold, will tell you in your mind and in your heartby the Holy Ghostwhich shall come upon you and which shall dwell in your heart. (D&C 8:1-2)

Asking questions is strongly recommended in developing and maintaining a testimony of Jesus Christ, not frowned upon (looking at the doctrine). The important thing is that we are honest seekers of truth, that we want to find out the answer and act on it.

Foundations of Faith

In considering all of this, this brother reminded the listener of something else. Whatever it is that someone has questions about regarding Church History, what is important to remember is that we are looking back and making judgments without full knowledge of the context. We also need to remember the foundations that we have already placed our faith on.

He likened it to the analogy of Santa Claus. When he was growing up, he learnt that certain details about Santa Claus weren’t completely the truth. That the reality was not exactly what had been painted for him whilst he was learning about Christmas and the traditions surrounding it. However, he had a choice. He could find out more and continue sticking with the things he knew to be good about the Christmas season – the gifts, the traditions and so on – or he could cut all ties with everything to do with what he had learnt about Santa Claus, including Christmas itself.

The point he was trying to make was that if we come across events from Church History that make us question, the important thing to consider is that you have developed faith on principles of truth. There are certain things that you have testified about that you have experience in finding out to be good and trustworthy. When faced with doubt, it is important to remember that. You can then search out answers through study, prayer and so on. Sometimes there may not even be an answer to the question you seek (yet), however we can be assured that there are answers to things we can find out about.

Verily, verily, say unto you, if you desire further witness, cast your mind upon the night that you cried unto me in your heart, that you might know concerning the truth of these things.

Did not speak peace to your mind concerning the matter? What greater witness can you have than from God? (D&C 6:22-23)

We can always turn to the Lord for guidance and reassurance – but we must develop a relationship in times when things seem straightforward for those times when faith seems difficult to find.

Prayer: The Father and Son Chat

Today I was listening to a Mormon Messages soundbite on preparing ourselves spiritually each day and the main focus moved onto prayer.

I am pretty diligent in my scripture study, even if it’s only a few verses a day, I attend my regular Church meetings and renew my covenants and I try to fulfill my callings to the best of my ability whilst balancing family life. However, the one practice that I never seem to get right or do consistently is my personal prayers. We say family prayers everyday and you would think as a return missionary I would be better at this. I have seen miracles, felt clear promptings as a direct result and witnessed changes in my own nature as a result of heartfelt prayer. So why do I struggle with it on a regular basis. I seem to leave Church each Sunday with the commitment to improve my personal prayers and then fall short! Why do I not call on my Heavenly Father? 

All these thoughts began to buzz around my mind as I listened closely to the audio clip. Later, they shared a passage of scripture from the Bible Dictionary. Some of it I remembered and have used in my own opportunities to teach such as a talk, or when I have ministered. However, there was a section they read which I was sure was from some other source and I even rewound the recording to listen to where they found it again, but it was indeed from the very same place: the Bible Dictionary. It says this:

“As soon as we learn the true relationship in which we stand toward God (namely, God is our Father, and we are His children), then at once prayer becomes natural and instinctive on our part (Matt. 7:7–11). Many of the so-called difficulties about prayer arise from forgetting this relationship.”

For some reason, despite knowing that God is my Heavenly Father, this struck a chord in me. I love speaking to my Dad – I know that he loves me and is pleased to see me when we meet. How much more then is my Heavenly Father eager to see me when I ‘meet’ Him in prayer. No disrespect to my earthly father, but my Heavenly Father is so much more able, willing to love and has given me more guidance and help in my life than my earthly father (although, I owe my life to him also). So why shouldn’t I be anxious to get on my knees and communicate with Him!? 

The answer is right there at the end of the Bible Dictionary passage – we forget about how intimate the relationship with our Heavenly Father is. In fact, the unfortunate paradox is that we probably understand this intimate relationship the best when we are already praying fervently and often…not before we begin the process. So how can we always remember this relationship with Heavenly Father so we are consistent in our prayers?

There will be many answers, each more useful or unique to different people. However, I think the main answer is one which relates to the wonderful teaching by Alma in Alma 32:28 where he says:

“Now, we will compare the word unto a seed. Now, if ye give place, that a seed may be planted in your heart, behold, if it be a true seed, or a good seed, if ye do not cast it out by your unbelief, that ye will resist the Spirit of the Lord, behold, it will begin to swell within your breasts; and when you feel these swelling motions, ye will begin to say within yourselves—It must needs be that this is a good seed, or that the word is good, for it beginneth to enlarge my soul; yea, it beginneth to enlighten my understanding, yea, it beginneth to be delicious to me.”

In other words, we just need to cast aside our apathy, our easiness to drift into relative contentment, and just get on our knees and do it! Then the next day, have some reminder ready and do it again! Try the word and see what happens. Only then can our hearts truly BEGIN to change. The word BEGIN is important there. It is a lifelong process which is why we are taught so often the basics – because we aren’t getting them all right yet.

Tonight – I will just do it!